Terrorist trial: defendants 'discussed attacking synagogue'

25 Oct 2012 by CST

Three men from Birmingham on trial at Woolwich Crown Court for terrorist offences allegedly discussed attacking a synagogue, amongst other possible targets:

The al-Qaeda inspired gang, from Birmingham, is accused of plotting to use eight suicide bombers to detonate rucksacks packed with explosives in crowded places to cause “mass death” and carnage on the streets of Britain.

Naseer, 31, Irfan Khalid, 27, and Ashik Ali, 27, all unemployed from Birmingham, are the alleged “senior members” and were among 12 people arrested and charged last year.

The trio deny between them a total of 12 terror charges including planning a bombing campaign, recruiting others for terrorism and terrorism fund-raising.

Conversations between them and others were secretly recorded by the police.

In one Naseer, who is known as Chubbs, talks about other methods of killing people he was taught about while allegedly undergoing terror training in Pakistan.

He said: "Make it and put it inside like, you know like Vaseline or cream like that, like Nivea cream and put it on people's cars.

"You know like the door handles on a whole, imagine putting it on whole like area innit overnight and when they come in the morning to work they start touching the, they open the door and then five minutes they die man, all of them start dying and that, kill about 1,000 people."

He added: “Even if we can't make a bomb, get guns yeah from the black geezers, Africans and charge in some like synagogue or charge in different places.”

The gang are alleged to have discussed building improvised explosive devices (IEDs) for a suicide bombing, and to have posed as charity collectors to raise money for their plot.


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